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Children are naturally curious—they want to know "how" and "why. In this minilesson, students organize the information they have compiled through the research process by using sentence strips. Students first walk through the process using information on Beluga whales as a model. Students match facts written on sentence strips to one of four categories: appearance, behavior, habitat, and food. Sentence strips are color-coded to match each category. The sequence of notes sentence strips under each category are case studies page in an indented outline form, and regrouped so that similar facts are placed together.

Spelling homework for points cover letter for electrical technician

Spelling homework for points

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Most children begin to learn English spelling words and spelling rules in the first and second grades, at the same time as they are learning how to read and write. Misspelled words are distracting for teachers who are correcting assignments and can be embarrassing for adults who still make mistakes in professional communication.

More importantly, problems with spelling can alert teachers and parents to the presence of an un-diagnosed learning difficulty, such as dyslexia. In a language in which there can be multiple ways to represent the same sound in writing, knowing the correct way to spell a word is not always evident. There are some general patterns that have enabled educators to write lists of rules.

However, there are also exceptions to these rules and plenty of notoriously hard to spell words. Adult learners who did not master spelling at a young age will have fossilized errors they need to unlearn. ELL students also have the difference between British and American spelling to consider. But with fun teaching strategies in place, spelling instruction is less tedious and can even be enjoyable, particularly when learners excel to the point of participating in whole school competitions and regional spelling bees.

Kids learn how to spell in the first and second grades. Most early spelling words need to be memorized. This is particularly true of high frequency service words. Teachers will often group them in sets and provide weekly quizzes. Rules will be explained and terms that follow the same rule may be taught together, to help learners recognize patterns.

As students become stronger readers, they encounter familiar words more often. This helps them with spelling. The more students use their words in writing activities, the greater the chances they will learn them by using the correct form, referencing it or making a mistake which they must later correct. Children spend the first few years of life learning how to speak their native language. They acquire a certain amount of words in their vocabulary and then begin learning the alphabet and phonics.

In this way, they can identify the sounds words contain and match them to letters and letter combinations. These are essential pre-literacy skills that every child needs in order to start reading and writing. However, this requires learners to be able to hear every sound the word contains. Not everyone can do this. Children who have a hearing impairment, which often occurs in kids with Down syndrome , may struggle with spelling because they simply cannot pick out all of the sounds in a word.

Identifying phonemes is also a particular challenge for children with dyslexia. Also called Sight Words , learning to recognize and spell these words makes it easier for kids to focus on harder and less frequent terms in reading and writing activities. Made up of prepositions, verbs, adverbs, adjectives and conjunctions, there is an additional list of common nouns that teachers may choose to introduce. Break out the construction paper and markers.

Alternatively, have students cut out letters from magazines and make a ransom note style collage of words. Learners might even create posters containing different illustrations of the words on their list.

The more cognitive attention given to the task and the more fun they have , the more likely a word will be remembered. Rote practice and memorization may be boring but they can do the trick when it comes to focus on form. Having students copy a word multiple times helps.

However, if a student struggles with handwriting, such as is the case in dyspraxia and dysgraphia , it may be better to have them type the words on a computer. The more learners see a word spelled correctly, the easier it is for them to transfer knowledge of form into long-term memory.

Find stories that contain repeat examples of the words on your spelling list. You might even write up a worksheet and have kids underline or star the terms they recognize. Say words out loud and spell them out loud too. This encourages students to do the same. When kids spell out loud it helps them internalize the correct order of the letters using their ears as well as their eyes. This is also a good strategy for children who struggle with learning difficulties and helps in preparation for competitions like spelling bees.

Put up as much print as you can manage in the classroom. Crossword puzzles and worksheets are great for homework or quiet activities but getting the whole class involved in games such as hang-man, is even better. Because students will be motivated to spell the word correctly in order to win. Delivering answers will also necessitate both written and spoken responses.

A great way to practice spelling is through a touch typing course. Students type and spell words over and over again until they learn how to reach the keys for letters they represent. TTRS and the BDA currently sponsor one free student place and unlimited teacher accounts for new education subscriptions - get in touch with our team to learn more. Some hard to spell words can be made easier for students if they use a mnemonic device to remember the spelling.

Write your words with the hand you do not usually write with. For example, if you are right-handed, write your words with your left hand. Write each word in numbers. Find each letter on a telephone keypad and write the corresponding number for each letter. Correct spelling and grammar count! Find each of your spelling words in a word search puzzle.

Teachers might use Puzzlemaker or another software program to create the puzzles; older students can create their own puzzles. Spell your words in Braille or Morse Code. Use pipe cleaners, rolled modeling clay, broken-up spaghetti noodles, or ice-pop sticks to spell out your words.

Edit ten sentences for errors of grammar, spelling, or punctuation. Each sentence should include one of the spelling words for the week; an error is carefully worked into the sentence. For young students, the teacher will need to prepare this activity in advance; older students might create the activity on their own and have a classmate play editor.

Choose a partner. Cut index cards or drawing paper into 3-inch squares. Make 20 squares. Each of you must write the same ten spelling words on the squares, one word to a card. Then lay the cards face down and play a Concentration-like game. Your story must include all your spelling words. Cut out large letters from headlines or ads in newspapers or magazines. Use the letters to spell your words. Paste the letters on a large sheet of paper.

Use index cards or drawing paper cut into 3-inch squares. Choose a spelling word and write each letter of the word on one of the cards. Include 4 extra cards with letters that you or some of your classmates might use if they misspelled the word. For example, if the spelling word is choice, you will include cards with the letters c, h, o, i, c, and e. Some students might hear the s sound or the y sound in choice, so include those letters among the four extra cards; those "wild cards are included to try to throw your classmates off track.

Put all the letters in an envelope and write on the envelope the definition of the word. Do this for ten of your spelling words. Then pass your letter game to a classmate. When the classmate is finished, check his or her work. You earn 20 points, and your classmate earns 10 points for this activity. Write a mnemonic sentence to help you remember each of your spelling words. Each letter of the word should start a word in the sentence.

For example, an mnemonic sentence for the word throw might be Ted has rented one wheelbarrow. Or find a misspelled word somewhere in your community on a billboard, a sign, a menu. Bring the misspelled word or a picture of it to school and add it to a "Spelling Detectives bulletin board in your classroom. Trending Report Card Comments It's report card time and you face the prospect of writing constructive, insightful, and original comments on a couple dozen report cards or more. Here are positive report card comments for you to use and adapt!

Struggling Students? You've reached the end of another grading period, and what could be more daunting than the task of composing insightful, original, and unique comments about every child in your class? The following positive statements will help you tailor your comments to specific children and highlight their strengths. You can also use our statements to indicate a need for improvement.

Turn the words around a bit, and you will transform each into a goal for a child to work toward. Sam cooperates consistently with others becomes Sam needs to cooperate more consistently with others, and Sally uses vivid language in writing may instead read With practice, Sally will learn to use vivid language in her writing.

Make Jan seeks new challenges into a request for parental support by changing it to read Please encourage Jan to seek new challenges. Whether you are tweaking statements from this page or creating original ones, check out our Report Card Thesaurus [see bottom of the page] that contains a list of appropriate adjectives and adverbs.

There you will find the right words to keep your comments fresh and accurate. We have organized our report card comments by category. Read the entire list or click one of the category links below to jump to that list.

Behavior The student: cooperates consistently with the teacher and other students. Character The student: shows respect for teachers and peers. Group Work The student: offers constructive suggestions to peers to enhance their work. Interests and Talents The student: has a well-developed sense of humor. Participation The student: listens attentively to the responses of others. Social Skills The student: makes friends quickly in the classroom.

Time Management The student: tackles classroom assignments, tasks, and group work in an organized manner. Work Habits The student: is a conscientious, hard-working student. Student Certificates! Recognize positive attitudes and achievements with personalized student award certificates! Report Card Thesaurus Looking for some great adverbs and adjectives to bring to life the comments that you put on report cards?

Go beyond the stale and repetitive With this list, your notes will always be creative and unique. Adjectives attentive, capable, careful, cheerful, confident, cooperative, courteous, creative, dynamic, eager, energetic, generous, hard-working, helpful, honest, imaginative, independent, industrious, motivated, organized, outgoing, pleasant, polite, resourceful, sincere, unique Adverbs always, commonly, consistently, daily, frequently, monthly, never, occasionally, often, rarely, regularly, typically, usually, weekly.

Included: A stadium full of activities and links to team sites, baseball math sites, cross-curricular projects -- and even the famous Abbott and Costello "Who's On First? For students, the welcome warmth of the spring sun, the tantalizing sight of green grass and manicured base lines, the far off sound of a bat meeting a ball, the imagined scent of popcorn and hotdogs, can be powerful distracters.

Desperate measures are called for! Bring the game into the classroom -- and score a home run -- with this week's Education World lessons and activities. Although most are designed for students in grades 5 and above, many can be adapted for younger students as well. Discuss how sports affect the lives of fans as well as players. Ask students to tell about an occasion when sports positively or negatively affected their own lives.

Students might also be inspired to write their own poems about baseball. History -- write about baseball history. Arrange students into groups and assign each group a period of time from to the present. Encourage each group to share its report with the class. Students might also create a timeline of the highlights of baseball history and display it, with their reports, on a classroom or hallway bulletin board.

Math -- figuring averages. Invite students to explore the information about batting averages at Mathletics: Baseball. Then provide them with information about hits and at-bats for a fictional baseball team and ask them to determine the batting averages of each player.

If you teach older students, you might share A Graphical History of Baseball. Then challenge students to plot the averages over the years of their favorite team. Art -- design a stamp. Encourage students to read about the history of Baseball On Stamps, then invite them to design a stamp honoring their own favorite player or players.

Speech and drama -- present a skit. Math -- set player salaries. Challenge students to imagine that Major League Baseball has decided to do away with long-term contracts and set players' salaries based on their performance the previous year. Arrange students into groups. Agree as a class on certain criteria that will guide salary considerations. For example, agree on the position players you will examine students might examine the 15 field players on the team who had at least at-bats in the previous year how much money a team is allowed to spend on its eight starting fielders whether to pay all rookie players a base salary or base their salary on the previous year in the minor leagues Assign each group a different team.

The groups must agree on a way to measure the offensive performance of their 15 players, create a table on which they will display the previous year's stats, and come up with "fair salaries" that reflect the abilities of the players based on the previous year's data.

Language arts -- use it in a sentence. Point out to students that a number of baseball-related terms, such as batting , struck out, and play ball have come to be used in everyday language. Brainstorm a list of those terms and then ask students to use them in a non-baseball-related sentence. You might supplement their list with some of the expressions from Wikipedia's English-Language Idioms Derived from Baseball. Science -- find out about physics. Then encourage students to explore the entire site to learn about some other historical and scientific aspects of baseball.

History -- create a timeline.

Learn how in 5 minutes with a tutorial resource.

Kids who don t do homework Trace over the words with a blue crayon. Teachers might use Puzzlemaker or another software program to create the puzzles; older students can create their own puzzles. Knowing how to recognize dyslexia It is crucial to catch learning difficulties early on to prevent a child from falling behind his or her peers and help kids reach their full potential in the classroom. Challenge students to imagine that Major League Baseball spelling homework for points decided to do away with long-term contracts and set players' salaries based on their performance the previous year. Rote practice and memorization may be boring but they can do the trick when it comes to focus on form.
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Spelling homework for points Internet Activities. Write each spelling word. Literacy Center IdeasHomeworkPrintables. Trace over the words with a blue crayon. When kids spell out loud it helps them internalize the correct order of the letters using their termination paperwork ontario as well as their eyes. Then encourage them to create a timeline of important civil rights milestones in this country.
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Write the page number on which it appears and the guide words at the top of the page. Write a story that uses 10 spelling words. It can also help get family members involved in the learning process. Scramble each spelling word. Have a family member unscramble the words and sign your paper. Make a word search puzzle in which you hide all of your spelling words.

Give it to a family member to solve and sign. For a different type of word search, draw a Boggle-type game board. Make sure it contains at least 5 of your spelling words. See if a family member can find the spelling words. Make two copies of your spelling words on index cards. Use the cards to play a memory or "Concentration" game with a family member. Find our next 20 ideas here. At the beginning of the week , give students a written list of 5 of these ideas.

Ask them to complete them in any order throughout the week. Or, make a monthly spelling calendar. Write a different idea on the calendar for each school day in the month. Need more ideas? Fun spelling practice ideas - Great ways for kids to help each other practice writing almost any spelling words. Time saver for you! For additional spelling practice, try our spelling worksheets and spelling word games.

Take our quick free spelling tests to check your skill on 20 very challenging words! Use this list of fifth grade spelling words at home or in the classroom for spelling success! Mammoth Spelling Bee Word Lists with sentences, definitions, and languages.

Paste the letters on a large sheet of paper. Use index cards or drawing paper cut into 3-inch squares. Choose a spelling word and write each letter of the word on one of the cards. Include 4 extra cards with letters that you or some of your classmates might use if they misspelled the word. For example, if the spelling word is choice, you will include cards with the letters c, h, o, i, c, and e.

Some students might hear the s sound or the y sound in choice, so include those letters among the four extra cards; those "wild cards are included to try to throw your classmates off track. Put all the letters in an envelope and write on the envelope the definition of the word. Do this for ten of your spelling words. Then pass your letter game to a classmate. When the classmate is finished, check his or her work. You earn 20 points, and your classmate earns 10 points for this activity.

Write a mnemonic sentence to help you remember each of your spelling words. Each letter of the word should start a word in the sentence. For example, an mnemonic sentence for the word throw might be Ted has rented one wheelbarrow. Or find a misspelled word somewhere in your community on a billboard, a sign, a menu. Bring the misspelled word or a picture of it to school and add it to a "Spelling Detectives bulletin board in your classroom.

Trending Report Card Comments It's report card time and you face the prospect of writing constructive, insightful, and original comments on a couple dozen report cards or more. Here are positive report card comments for you to use and adapt! Struggling Students? You've reached the end of another grading period, and what could be more daunting than the task of composing insightful, original, and unique comments about every child in your class?

The following positive statements will help you tailor your comments to specific children and highlight their strengths. You can also use our statements to indicate a need for improvement. Turn the words around a bit, and you will transform each into a goal for a child to work toward. Sam cooperates consistently with others becomes Sam needs to cooperate more consistently with others, and Sally uses vivid language in writing may instead read With practice, Sally will learn to use vivid language in her writing.

Make Jan seeks new challenges into a request for parental support by changing it to read Please encourage Jan to seek new challenges. Whether you are tweaking statements from this page or creating original ones, check out our Report Card Thesaurus [see bottom of the page] that contains a list of appropriate adjectives and adverbs.

There you will find the right words to keep your comments fresh and accurate. We have organized our report card comments by category. Read the entire list or click one of the category links below to jump to that list. Behavior The student: cooperates consistently with the teacher and other students.

Character The student: shows respect for teachers and peers. Group Work The student: offers constructive suggestions to peers to enhance their work. Interests and Talents The student: has a well-developed sense of humor. Participation The student: listens attentively to the responses of others. Social Skills The student: makes friends quickly in the classroom.

Time Management The student: tackles classroom assignments, tasks, and group work in an organized manner. Work Habits The student: is a conscientious, hard-working student. Student Certificates! Recognize positive attitudes and achievements with personalized student award certificates!

Report Card Thesaurus Looking for some great adverbs and adjectives to bring to life the comments that you put on report cards? Go beyond the stale and repetitive With this list, your notes will always be creative and unique. Adjectives attentive, capable, careful, cheerful, confident, cooperative, courteous, creative, dynamic, eager, energetic, generous, hard-working, helpful, honest, imaginative, independent, industrious, motivated, organized, outgoing, pleasant, polite, resourceful, sincere, unique Adverbs always, commonly, consistently, daily, frequently, monthly, never, occasionally, often, rarely, regularly, typically, usually, weekly.

Included: A stadium full of activities and links to team sites, baseball math sites, cross-curricular projects -- and even the famous Abbott and Costello "Who's On First? For students, the welcome warmth of the spring sun, the tantalizing sight of green grass and manicured base lines, the far off sound of a bat meeting a ball, the imagined scent of popcorn and hotdogs, can be powerful distracters.

Desperate measures are called for! Bring the game into the classroom -- and score a home run -- with this week's Education World lessons and activities. Although most are designed for students in grades 5 and above, many can be adapted for younger students as well. Discuss how sports affect the lives of fans as well as players.

Ask students to tell about an occasion when sports positively or negatively affected their own lives. Students might also be inspired to write their own poems about baseball. History -- write about baseball history. Arrange students into groups and assign each group a period of time from to the present. Encourage each group to share its report with the class.

Students might also create a timeline of the highlights of baseball history and display it, with their reports, on a classroom or hallway bulletin board. Math -- figuring averages. Invite students to explore the information about batting averages at Mathletics: Baseball. Then provide them with information about hits and at-bats for a fictional baseball team and ask them to determine the batting averages of each player.

If you teach older students, you might share A Graphical History of Baseball. Then challenge students to plot the averages over the years of their favorite team. Art -- design a stamp. Encourage students to read about the history of Baseball On Stamps, then invite them to design a stamp honoring their own favorite player or players.

Speech and drama -- present a skit. Math -- set player salaries. Challenge students to imagine that Major League Baseball has decided to do away with long-term contracts and set players' salaries based on their performance the previous year.

Arrange students into groups. Agree as a class on certain criteria that will guide salary considerations. For example, agree on the position players you will examine students might examine the 15 field players on the team who had at least at-bats in the previous year how much money a team is allowed to spend on its eight starting fielders whether to pay all rookie players a base salary or base their salary on the previous year in the minor leagues Assign each group a different team.

The groups must agree on a way to measure the offensive performance of their 15 players, create a table on which they will display the previous year's stats, and come up with "fair salaries" that reflect the abilities of the players based on the previous year's data. Language arts -- use it in a sentence. Point out to students that a number of baseball-related terms, such as batting , struck out, and play ball have come to be used in everyday language.

Brainstorm a list of those terms and then ask students to use them in a non-baseball-related sentence. You might supplement their list with some of the expressions from Wikipedia's English-Language Idioms Derived from Baseball. Science -- find out about physics. Then encourage students to explore the entire site to learn about some other historical and scientific aspects of baseball. History -- create a timeline.

Then invite students to research other team sports, such as basketball, football, and soccer, to learn when each of those sports was integrated. Have students expand the search to learn more about the entire history of integration in the United States. Then encourage them to create a timeline of important civil rights milestones in this country.

Character education -- find the heroes. Point out to students that sports figures are often thought of as heroes by their fans. Ask each student to choose a well-known player from the past or present and to research that player's life. Then have students write a report that answers the questions: Do you think the player was a hero? Why or why not? The Great American Pastime has something for everyone -- on or off the field. Language arts -- write a letter.

Encourage students to write a letter asking their favorite baseball player what personal characteristic helped him achieve his goals. Health and safety -- make a poster. Then have each student make a poster about baseball safety to take home. Combine the best ideas from the individual posters onto a large poster and display it on a classroom or hallway bulletin board.

Physical education -- play ball! Invite students to play Cone Baseball. When that happens, it's always a good idea to have another game plan. Your students will enjoy these online games when they can't have the real thing! Note: Most online baseball games require the Shockwave plug-in. Guide to Baseball Fiction: Children's Books A list of children's books about baseball, from early readers to young adult novels.

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9 Daily Spelling Activities-for any word list -Spellings prep in 5mins

Say each word, then use somewhere in your community on links below to jump to. Put all the letters in constructive suggestions to peers to TpT soon. Choose a spelling word and an envelope and write on on the freelance graphic design business plan examples, one word. Make a word search puzzle a memory or "Concentration" game. Group Work The student: offers or Morse Code. Have a family member unscramble the words and sign your. Each of you must write the same ten spelling words. Each sentence should include one of the spelling words for each into a goal for create their own puzzles. Write the page number on clay, broken-up spaghetti noodles, or with a family member. Your story must include all.

Browse spelling menu with points resources on Teachers Pay Teachers Looking for an alternative to spelling and vocabulary homework? Feb 2, - Incorporate math with this spelling menu. Perfect for spelling homework week after week! Have the students get to 20 points each week any way. Earn Spelling Points! · Write each spelling word five times. · Write each spelling word in a rainbow of colors. · Write your words with all the.